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There is a dichotomy that is often created in conversations about humanity - between reality and idealism. In a sense, a capture of such a division could lead a person to discover a novel approach to important matters of our time. It is crucial to me that every artwork has such a connection point to both the ‘idealised’ world and the ‘real’ one. This is the reason behind my evident fascination with the world of children, and how that relates to the very complicated issues of both the conscious and unconscious world of existing and non-existing.

The connection between the work itself and the process thereof is vitally important in order to understand its meaning. The cutting of the wood is done by hand; this affords me a more authentic and honest connection with each piece. In a way, this seems to defy technologically advanced methods, such as laser-cutting, which speeds up the process and goes against the controlled, impersonal accuracy of the digital realm. Every single line that is visible on the side edge of each cut-out figure is proof of the process I call ‘carving’- challenging the traditional meaning of the word. Instead of following the line with the band-saw blade, the cut is made by going towards the line – carving away millimetres of wood at a time. Each piece of wood has been kept in its natural state with no oils, stains or varnishes used on the surface – therefore retaining its identity.

Patterns play a very important role within the conceptualisation of each piece; a specific pattern could represent a visual extension or refer to behavioural patterns found in different circumstances. These pieces are often in direct contrast to the perception that surrounds supremacy, and also carries with it a sense of fragility that is shown in the raw but delicately cut pieces of wood.

The Times - Art Spot - March 15/2010